The calling of Barnabas and Saul

View this email in your browser

 

April 22, 2019

In this week’s Illuminate, the first half of the study focuses on the calling of Barnabas and Saul in Acts 13, verse 2: “While they were worshiping the Lord and fasting, the Holy Spirit said, ‘Set apart for me Barnabas and Saul for the work to which I have called them.’” So after they had finished praying, in verse 3, “They laid their hands on them and sent them off.” In verse 4, Barnabas and Saul “went down to Seleucia; and from there they sailed to Cyprus.” 

Notice how fast the narrative moves. The Holy Spirit speaks during worship, and the next thing you know – just two sentences later – Barnabas and Saul are on a boat.

It makes me curious. Did the Holy Spirit speak through a single person, or did they sense the leading of the Spirit inwardly and simultaneously? Was there any resistance to the message that doesn’t get recorded here, or was it obvious to everyone present that this was the way forward? If they weren’t initially clear, how did they reach clarity? And unity?


These are questions I struggle with in the work to which God has called me at Barclay Press, and I think these are also questions for us in our families and in our faith communities. Are we joining with others to listen together for the leading of the Spirit? Do our convictions come out of “worshiping the Lord and fasting” (13:2) or “fasting and praying” (13:3), and what does that mean or how does that happen in our contexts? If we experience a clear call to go, are we willing to go even if our current work is unfinished?

These are questions I’m going to be sitting with this week. In the meantime, here are some relevant words from Margaret Fell that further challenge and encourage me (and that I hope might be helpful for you):


“Am I present with thee, and have communion with thee, my dear heart whom the Lord hath chosen out of the world and separated thee out from the world, for his own work and service, to communicate to others what thou hast received from him the fountain of infinite and eternal life, that others may partake of the same with you, the Lord God of power is arising and the glory of his majesty, and the living fountain of life is opening, the streams of his everlasting love is coming forth, into the hearts of his people, and he is raising up his own seed, that it may serve him in the land of the living, and now he is bringing to pass and fulfilling his many and great promises in the day of the deliverance of Zion.”

Thank you,
Eric Muhr

P.S. We have received financial gifts from thirty-nine individuals and churches, totaling nearly $10,000 and putting us just over one-sixth of the way toward our goal of $56,000 for the year. Barclay Press is a non-profit ministry of Friends, and we are only able to do the work we do because of your support. You can join in supporting the continuing work of Barclay Press by clicking DONATE at barclaypress.com, or by sending a check to Barclay Press, 211 N Meridian St #101, Newberg OR 97132.





 
BARCLAY
PRESS

211 N. Meridian St. #101
Newberg, OR 97132
503.538.9775


www.barclaypress.com

Seeds of Hope
Copyright © 2019 Barclay Press, All rights reserved.


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

What Is Justice?

View this email in your browser

 

April 15, 2019

Matthew Avery Solomon and Noel Espinoza were murdered on September 4, 2008. Three men were charged with the crime. In What Is Justice?: A Personal Exploration, author Bill Denham studies the crime and what it reveals about himself and about our broader culture’s pursuit of retributive justice. Incorporating poetry, philosophy, theology, and memoir, Denham suggests an alternative system borne out of our inter-connectedness and reliant on the exercise of our imaginations. What Is Justice?: A Personal Exploration is an engaging, deeply personal, and deeply felt exploration into the meaning of justice. It is an essential and thought-provoking piece.

“Wrestling with grief over the killing of a boy he loved as a son, Denham confronts his own impulses to condemn the ones who murdered him. With the courage to perform  ‘open-heart surgery’ on himself, Denham returns again and again to restorative justice as the only way forward. A solemn read, a quiet contemplation, a hopeful longing, What Is Justice? is a respite for anyone committed to labors of love and justice.”

Valarie Kaur, Founder of the Revolutionary Love Project


“There is a murder; there is a pending ‘execution.’ There are victims and there are perpetrators. Into the midst of these deep contradictions, Bill Denham plunges with his honest, searing, hope-filled poetry. He dares to imagine that we are all bound together in this human crisis as one. We are not ‘over-against’; we are rather ‘with’ and ‘belonging to.’ That solidarity evokes compassion that presses toward restorative justice and away from revenge. Denham sees that it ‘falls to me’ to do justice. Indeed, it ‘falls to me’ and you and you and you. Those who enter Denham’s world of poetic imagination may be called to care in transformative ways. It is his hope. Indeed, it is our hope!

Walter Brueggemann, Columbia Theological Seminary


“What does it mean to love our enemies? I know of no better answer in our time than the care Bill Denham shows the men who killed his stepson. With vulnerability and courage, he uses a poet’s ear and a prophet’s eye to redefine justice. His story moved me deeply.”

Bruce Murphy, retired as President at Northwestern College, a former Pastor at La Jolla Presbyterian Church and Bethany Presbyterian Church


“Bill Denham has given us a gift in a few short pages. As he shares his experience of losing someone he loves to violent death, he invites us to accompany him as he searches his own heart and enters as he can into another’s experience. The insights he gathers into his poetry, prose, and the quotations he incorporates challenge us to do the hard work of subverting the systems that numb us by learning compassion for the other.”

Becky Ankeny, Ph.D., Recorded minister in Sierra-Cascades Yearly Meeting of Friends


“After the 2008 gang-related murder of his stepson, Bill Denham embarked on ten years of deep and profoundly revealing self-examination. This book is a compelling account of the results of that questioning. Here, in both prose and poems, Denham voices an impassioned plea for replacing our retributive justice system with restorative justice. Avowing that true justice ‘must come from an honest and humble place,’ he bears wise and eloquent witness to ‘the excruciatingly hard work of forgiveness and reconciliation.’”

Paulann Petersen, Oregon Poet Laureate Emerita





 
BARCLAY
PRESS

211 N. Meridian St. #101
Newberg, OR 97132
503.538.9775


www.barclaypress.com

Seeds of Hope
Copyright © 2019 Barclay Press, All rights reserved.


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Quakers Uniting in Publications

View this email in your browser

 

April 8, 2019

A week ago, a small team of us hosted the annual conference of Quakers Uniting in Publications (QUIP) at Canby Grove Christian Center. The gathering of Friends included publishers, booksellers, editors, and authors from three countries and eleven states with a focus this year on the theme of “Building Bridges.” Some highlights from our time together:

  • Adlai Amor shared briefly about the long lasting devastation of and our complicity with racism through the Doctrine of Discovery. 
  • Peggy Senger Morrison challenged us to reach beyond Quakerism in the work we do – to not be afraid of making the world a better place.
  • Iris Graville moderated a panel of representatives from two yearly meetings and four monthly meetings about the discerning, writing, and seasoning that go into our books of Faith and Practice.
  • Paul Buckley presented historical research into Quaker discipline in the quietest period and how a strong focus on integrity and adherence to Quaker identity facilitated Quaker reforms. 
  • Sarah Hoggatt led us in worship sharing focused on where we are building from and where we are going as Quaker writers and publishers.
  • Marge Abbott and Anna Baker read from letters they wrote to each other during a time that they were working to build theological and relational bridges with each other and through the Pacific Northwest Quaker Women’s Theology Conference.
  • Eileen Flanagan, Vanessa Julye, and Lucy Duncan offered a panel discussion on building bridges through difficult conversations, pulling from their work on race, immigration, and climate change.
  • Karie Firoozmand shared about the process of book reviewing that she’s implemented during her time at Friends Journal.

Quakerism has a historic reputation for being a faith that gets things done – a faith that builds bridges. But our work isn’t done. And after this QUIP conference, I’m encouraged. We have a lot of good people, good organizations and institutions, good work yet to do. This gives me hope.

Thank you!

Eric Muhr

P.S. Barclay Press is a non-profit ministry of Friends, and we are only able to do the work we do because of your support. You can join in supporting the continuing work of Barclay Press by clicking DONATE at barclaypress.com, or by sending a check to Barclay Press, 211 N Meridian St #101, Newberg OR 97132.





 
BARCLAY
PRESS

211 N. Meridian St. #101
Newberg, OR 97132
503.538.9775


www.barclaypress.com

Seeds of Hope
Copyright © 2019 Barclay Press, All rights reserved.


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp